Neat Science Thursday – Scientific communication is hard

For my dissertation research, I studied the mechanisms of viral persistence in the central nervous system using an in vitro model consisting of picornavirus infections of differentiated and undifferentiated murine neural progenitor and stem cells. To some of my non-science friends and family, that explanation sounds something like, “I studied blah blah blah, miscellaneous pretentious...
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Neat Science Thursday – citizen science is a solution

In case you missed it, Caren Cooper et al. just published a fascinating research article on PLOS One (it’s open access, so check it out!) detailing her investigations on the contributions of citizen scientists in ornithological (bird) research. In this article the researchers aimed to “evaluate the use and confidence of citizen science in advancing understanding in an important area...
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Wikipedia is for reals, Gene Wiki is legit

Professor Murray Jennex is an information systems whiz. He would start his classes on Information Security and Decision Support Systems with an open and frank discussion on relevant current affairs. During one of these discussions he raised a question regarding the accuracy of the information on wikipedia. Yes, it is open so that the entries can be vandalized; yes, Stephen Colbert did prove that...
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I am ready for work, but is work ready for me?

Yes! Yes, of course! There is always plenty to do and so much to learn in an awesome lab. This is not what I mean by data mining The lab that I joined does a lot of data mining and has a lot of ongoing projects many of which could use participation from the general public and the biomedical research community at large. If you study genes, you can contribute just by using the awesome BioGPS.org...
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