A look back at 2016 with Mark2Cure

Happy New Year!!! Thank you for contributing to Mark2Cure with your annotations, comments, questions, bug reports–and general feedback. You’ve made the Mark2Cure project an amazing project to work on and we are so grateful that you found us. Many of you have been kind enough to report bugs and we are definitely trying to fix them. However, we only have one research programmer working...
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Mark2Cure anniversary and NGLY1 Mark2Curathon review

It has been an exciting two weeks! In celebration of the anniversary of our campaign for NGLY1, we launched a new module in Mark2Cure, followed by a launch event and a Mark2Curathon. Hence, we have a lot of prizes to send out this week. If you’ve won a prize or a marker, details on how to claim your reward will be sent to you in a separate email. If not, there will be ample opportunities in the...
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Mark2Curathon happening now!

It’s now April 15th, and the official start of the Mark2Curathon! Thanks to our Mark2Curators, two of our doc sets were completed before the start of the Mark2Curathon, so we will be opening TWO new doc sets–making more prizes available. The new doc sets finish off the investigation of autophagy’s involvement in neurological symptoms, and begin investigating something...
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Crowdsourcing for information extraction and for peer review

If it hasn’t been evident enough from the Gene Wiki activity, or BioGPS’s community expandable resources (plugins), or our citizen science initiative, Mark2Cure, we’re very enthusiastic about crowdsourcing and community-based resources here in the Su Lab. If you’ve been following Mark2Cure, you may know that our beta experiment focused on named entity recognition for...
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New Mark2Cure features in development

Over the last week, we’ve been user-testing some features which we hope to introduce in the future. Some of these features are still in very early stages of development, so it may be awhile before our Mark2Curators start to see them. Since some of our Mark2Curators are also members of other rare disease or patient communities, we’d like to reiterate how Mark2curators could leverage their...
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How helping find clues for NGLY1-deficiency can help other rare disease communities

When we first started moving Mark2Cure from Amazon Mechanical Turk to the internet at large, we decided early on that we would let the contributors take the steering wheel on the project. During beta testing, advocates from various rare disease communities (like Hashimoto’s Encephalitis, Cystic Fibrosis, and Cystinosis) made significant contributions; but the NGLY1 community made a concerted...
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